Disciple-making starts at home: “I watch their faith and their dedication to trust and follow me because I follow Jesus”

By Izah Broadus

When people think about the ministry of a church, they probably think of the pastors and ministers and what they do. What people might take for granted? The ministers’ families!  

Our family talks about the ministry at New Faith. I mean, it’s a big part of our lives. I make sure my family is involved—that they are not just members but they are also growing in the Lord and growing with the church.

But something I always want to make sure of is that I’m not pressuring them into something. My hope is that they will seek the Lord because they want to. Like Jesus said, “Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you.” (Matthew 7:7) At the same time, I watch their faith and their dedication to trust and follow me because I follow Jesus.

Right now our family lives in Little Rock, and we have two daughters in Pine Bluff. Because of the distance, my girls are not able to be a part of everything that happens at the church. Even so, God is using our family to make an impact.

My wife isn’t in West Helena all the time, but when she is in town the young ladies come to her for advice and look up to her. And our children! They have a funny, on-going argument about who is going to open the service or read Scripture for our Youth Sunday every month. It’s amazing how God is using them to bring others to the church and bringing them into a relationship with Jesus.

In the last few weeks, my wife has been talking about how it’s time for us to move to West Helena. It brought joy to my heart to know that she sees what God is doing in West Helena through New Faith! I think I almost cried because it has been on my heart and I didn’t want to pressure her into moving.

After a lot of prayer, we both feel that’s what God is leading our family to do. Please be in prayer for us as we are looking at some houses and plan to make that transition at the end of the year.

Seeing God’s hand

Because we see how God has blessed what we are doing, we have dreams. With the after-school program and our six-week summer program (starting June 12) bringing new kids to New Faith, we want to continue creating more events that focus on children and youth. We want the church to be open every day of the week!

And we have lots of helpers. My kids and other youth in the church are eager to be there and eager to serve. I’ve also seen God’s anointing on a young man named Stanley.

Stanley—who is now 17 years old—came to New Faith with his father about a year ago. Even though his dad left, Stanley stayed. I’m amazed when I hear him talk, and all the kids in the church look up to him.

I thought that Stanley would want to find himself a job after just graduating from high school, but he wants to be involved in what the church is doing. He plays the drums for New Faith, and he volunteers with our after-school program. I’ve noticed how he mentors the kids, and I think about how he could have easily found a job instead. But God has used him here!  

Actually, Stanley recently said he feels God is leading him into ministry. He wants to stick around at the church and go to a local community college to continue his education.

God is truly at work in New Faith Baptist Church and West Helena!

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What’s your focus?

By Anthony Banks

Whether you are bi-vocational or in ministry full-time, you are in for a ride. As a pastor, minister, or church planter, a lot of times people don’t really understand what you are going through balancing family, work, and church. Nothing is easy, and sometimes you will struggle to find the motivation to continue.

That’s why it is so important that your motivation comes from constantly staying in prayer!

I know I’m not telling you anything new when I say you need focus. You know good and well that you can’t let anything slip. “Slipping” happens when you forget to do things at home because of the ministry, or when you struggle to find time at church because of your work.

There is no way, decent or above decent, to love my family, take care of the ministry, or maintain my job if I am not focused on the Lord! 

First, there is my family. My wife needs me, and my kids need me. They need my love and my care and my affection and my time. Scripture says my family is my priority, because if I can’t lead and care for my family well, then how can I take care of the church? (1 Timothy 3:1-5)

{ There is no way, decent or above decent, to love my family, take care of the ministry, or maintain my job if I am not focused on the Lord! }


Then there is Second Baptist Turrell, where the people need a teacher and a listener and a counselor. I don’t want to neglect one of them because they’re all important. I’m not a hired hand but a servant, one who serves by giving of himself and leading his sheep, and I am responsible to God for how I lead.

And last, but not least, is work. Of course I must do the job I have been hired to do. Unlike in the ministry where I want to be like Christ going after one sheep gone astray, at work I am more like a shepherd looking for all the other sheep! My drive and focus at work tends to be different from the ministry. 

I pray and talk with Him about these things—what all these people want from me—and then pray for myself! You and I must have His help if we are to do all these things as He would have us to do.

But I’m just warning you: stepping out in this feels like quicksand. You’re going to have to trust. Because when thoughts and distractions come flooding in, that’s when you have to continue to keep your eyes on Him.

Remember how Peter was walking on the water toward Jesus? I am like Peter sometimes because when He wants me to come out on the water, I go, but then I get distracted by the wind and the waves. I would say to a pastor or church planter, “Don’t take your eyes off Him!”

Distractions are a form of worrying. I would say that if you’re going to pray, then why worry? You have to do one or the other. Worrying can’t add anything to your life but stress. Worrying doesn’t add time or days to your life.

If you are worrying, then you are not trusting Him because worry won’t allow you to trust. Worrying is like saying that someone is standing behind you and strong enough to catch you, but you’re still worried about them catching you when you fall. You aren’t trusting them.

{ …when thoughts and distractions come flooding in, that’s when you have to continue to keep your eyes on Him. }


Maybe at the church you’re worried about an increase in visitors, salvations, or baptisms. Are you worrying why there aren’t more? Are you worrying about what you’re doing or not doing? Scripture says, “I planted the seed, Apollos watered it, but God gave the increase…” (1 Corinthians 3:6-8)

You just plant! Water if you have to, but God will send the increase. That is what the Word says: to trust Him! If we’re focusing on other things like Peter, then we’ll start sinking. We must continue to focus on Him.

“Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not rely on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will direct your paths.” (Proverbs 3:5-6)

Come to your family with complete trust in Him. Come to your ministry with complete trust in Him. Come to your job with complete trust in Him. If you’re not focused on God, why are you doing any of it? God should be the focus first, always.

Without Him, there is no us. That’s the reason we have to get up in the morning and say, “You have given me this morning, and You are the reason I woke up this morning.”

A lot of times we “lose it” because we lose focus. At the end of a long day we are tired and lose focus, but in the morning we wake up with a fresh look! We don’t wake up because we’re good; we wake up because He is good!

He has given us this day. That’s focus.

How do you know if you’re qualified to be a church planter? (1)

By Andrew Munneke

So you are interested in church planting, or maybe even feel the call to plant a church? You marvel at the beauty of the Gospel and are filled with excitement for the potential of what your church may become. There is just one problem: you don’t know what qualifies you to plant a church.

Character and Weakness

A month ago we took our 3-year-old son to a boat show. He loves getting behind the steering wheel, running up and down the aisle, and imagining we are out on the lake having a good time. My imagination ran with him, and for a moment I actually thought about what it would be like to take my son out on Beaver Lake with the wind in our hair and the sun on our backs.

And then I remembered…I know nothing about boats. I don’t know how to take care of them, how to winterize them, or even how the engines work.

Many aspiring planters see church planting like that boat show. It seems fun, exciting and adventurous, but they know very little about how they are wired. Church planting is not for the faint of heart because it exposes our weaknesses, reveals our idols, and tests our faith. What will take you out of ministry is not your vision statement, personality type, or your leadership pipeline—it’s your character.

In 1 Timothy 3, Paul penned his qualifications for a leader in the church. Go ahead and get your Bible and open it (I’ll wait because I want you to make note of this). How many of those qualifications that Paul mentions are skilled oriented? Just one—the ability to teach. All the others are character-driven. It’s 10 percent what you know and 90 percent of who you are. So according to Paul, what qualifies you for leadership in the body of Christ is not your logo or your new cutting edge way of doing church; it’s are you someone who loves Jesus more than anything else? 

{ Church planting is not for the faint of heart because it exposes our weaknesses, reveals our idols, and tests our faith. }

Now take a look at that list again. Do you know where you a weak? Are you self-aware to know what you run to for significance, identity, purpose and hope instead of Christ? Do you know the sin that can take you out of the ministry because Satan knows it, and he is coming after you? In church planting, every weakness is magnified and every character flaw is tested. It exposes the idols of your heart. 

The Heart and Glory

So let’s just pause and ask yourself this question: What is my heart really after? One overarching issue I see with church planters specifically is a kind of glory-hunger. It’s more of an inward focus vs. an upward focus. More than a focus of, “I want God to do a good work in my city,” I’m more concerned about what God has done or will do through me.

In other words, if something was done through someone else, would I still be grateful for that? Or would I give glory to God regardless of if He used me? If we’re honest—both pastors and planters—something we have a hard time giving up is this hope of God wanting to do things through us.

Yes, we want to see God glorified and made known. That is a part of a church planter’s heart, and metrics and numbers tie-in to that. We want to see growth and impact—more missional communities, baptisms, social media engagement—constantly measuring and evaluating our own success by metrics.

In the first few years of planting The Hill, my mood would be swayed based on attendance or the feedback I was getting. It would destroy me if I ran into someone who visited our church wearing a T-shirt from another church in town. Church planting spread my insecurities like a rash that never would seem to go away, and the more it was scratched the wider it spread.looking-down-the-aisle

But the call in Scripture is the call to be faithful, not successful. The call is being what you’re called to be: putting all your faith and trust in Christ. If your identity is not in Christ but in this church plant, then it’s going to unravel you.

I think a desire of humanity is to be a part of marvelous things and see great, magnificent things happen. We love going to Razorback games, and we like it when our friends like our social media posts. We are drawn to this kind of glory. This is engrained in us because God designed us to be with Him, but because of the Fall we’ve lost intimacy and now seek the created world for that glory.

Adam and Eve wanted to seek the glory of themselves, and we can fall into the same sin of glory-hunger. But the beauty of the Gospel is that this desire to be around glory—to be known, approved, accepted, that you matter—can only be and is fulfilled in Christ.

When Jesus gives the analogy, “Come to me you who are weak and weary…” especially for people in ministry, the reason the yoke is easy for us is that Jesus is pulling the weight. We can go into ministry, bring Him honor, and lift Him up without trying to prove ourselves in ministry. It frees us of the weight. The one who fulfills the ministry is not you. You’re just being faithful to what He’s called you to do.

{ But the call in Scripture is the call to be faithful, not successful. The call is being what you’re called to be: putting all your faith and trust in Christ. }

As church planters we get so excited about the potential of what our church can be, or we are in awe of how the church is reaching people. We might have the noble motivations of reaching people for Christ, but are we really in awe of the beauty and power of Christ? Are people being reached, not because of a logo and slick campaign, but because God is honoring our faithfulness to do what He’s called us to do?

There is just as much honor and glory for the church that brings one person to Jesus as there is a church that’s brought 1,000 people to Him. It’s all a miracle, and this should make us all move in awe. Maybe God did give someone a higher domain or blessing than another, but knowing He is working frees you to be the pastor and church planter that God has called and needs you to be.

In church planting we get caught up in, “This is going to be amazing! Sexy! We’re going to solve and we’re going to fix all these issues!” It’s beautiful, but it’s also difficult and hard. Like marriage, it’s not that every day is perfect. It’s that a lot of days aren’t perfect, but going to bed and saying, “I’m fighting for you and pursuing you.” That’s what makes it beautiful—because it isn’t easy.

Identity in Christ

That’s why I want to bring you back to 1 Timothy 3. Instead of looking at what we think qualifies us, even though gifts matter and personalities matter, our character is the first thing that matters. Even for people with the best intentions to spread the Gospel, there still needs to be a season of pausing and using Paul’s character test to go deeper. To ask, “What are my moral weaknesses? What is my heart really after?” instead of asking, “Am I capable of doing this?”

I can truly say there are days in my ministry and The Hill Church that I have marveled at what God has done and what I have done. One needs to be fought for. One needs to be fought against. My feeling goes to the thought of not being successful, or things not going according to plan, vs. doing what God’s called me to do.

So maybe for you, where you are right now, the first step is actually to know that your identity is in Christ and not who you are or what you do—a husband, a baker, etc. The problem with this is 1. it’s sin and 2. it actually takes away your identity. With one change, all of a sudden my identity could be shattered. If my identity is in being a church planter, what happens when the church I planted seeks a new voice? Or if the church falls apart?

{ If my identity is in being a church planter, what happens when the church I planted seeks a new voice? Or if the church falls apart? }

If my identity is in Christ—where it should be, the one thing that does not change—then my identity is never in crisis. My church could be 100 or 1,000 people, or my core group could leave, and I’m still secure!

We all have times when we know the Gospel but don’t believe the Gospel. I can know God loves me and is in control, but anxiety shows because I don’t believe it. I need to remind myself and trust in what I know is true. Anxiety feels lonely, abandoned, but when identity is found in Christ, it’s something we believe but don’t forget.

I’m not sitting here four years into church planting perfected; I still have weaknesses. I know my weaknesses will continue to be my weaknesses, but I need to continue to put my trust in Christ.

Ready for the next step? Start reading the second blog of this series.

3 questions to ask when measuring the success of your ministry

By Lee Kemp 

As a pastor, you wouldn’t tell members of your church to compare themselves to someone else in the church, right? You would tell them to compare themselves with Christ. We need to validate that concept at a corporate level.

When we are examining our churches’ visions and goals, how are we tracking success? I think a lot of times we are comparing ourselves with other churches. For example, it’s probably not fair to compare a First Baptist Church downtown to a cowboy church. We’ve got to look at what we’re measuring, and with metrics that fit those churches. 

I also think that God doesn’t even care about some of the things we measure. There’s a big conversation among guys right now about this question, “Is what we thought was success really success?” Don’t take my word for it. Google “changing the scorecard of ministry” and see what’s out there. Or checkout how authors like Reggie McNeil are contributing to the conversation with his book “Missional Renaissance: Changing the Scorecard for the Church.” 

At Forefront, we have sat in meetings and felt unsuccessful. But then we would stop and think about people we are ministering to and things we are doing in the community. That would incite us again to keep doing what we needed to do.

When we first started talking to the Boys and Girls Club, they said “We don’t work with churches at all.” We kept talking with them, sought out every way we could serve them, and then later were able to use their space—but they still wanted it off the record. Now we are able to gather there for worship on the record. That’s a success!

When we don’t have good metrics, it makes us question our faithfulness, or worse, God’s faithfulness. And a lot of times, it comes down to asking the right questions…

1. What is a church?

Alan Hirsch, a big author in the missional community, says that because God is advancing His kingdom in different times with all kinds of different people, then there are going to be all kinds of expressions of ekklesia.

This is happening in Arkansas. There are all kinds of churches being planted that are different expressions of ekklesia. One thing we will have to do to continue to have that kind of expression is to change our scorecard.

The metric could be the church’s vision.  Forefront’s vision is to reach the lost, equip the saved, and serve God by using our gifts to show Jesus to the River Valley community and beyond. My point is that nowhere in that vision does this mean Sunday morning attendance, a measurement of our building square footage, or our budget.

2. Can you name the people you’ve impacted?

This may be a better question than some of the usual questions we ask. Maybe you reached five new people this month, but do you know their names? It could be as simple as listing their names when you talk about the impact of your ministry. 

When your staff says, “This was a hard summer—with people traveling and all—but here are five people who got connected with our church while y’all were gone. They’re excited…” you are staying faithful to the course without questioning “Where’s God?”

3. Who is being discipled outside of Sunday mornings?

We might be tempted to think that if we are reaching the lost we will have more people in our church, or that equipping the saved will bring more unbelievers to our church on Sunday morning. That’s not necessarily true. We need to develop a moving, mobile metric to track disciples who make disciples. 

Churches will list budget numbers and things, but very rarely do they sit down and list people who have been paired up for discipleship. Maybe that’s a good new metric because the rubber meets the road when we say, “Here’s Johnny, who’s going to disciple him? Here’s Suzie, who’s going to disciple her?” Your hand is being forced to the paper, and this makes ministry real.

———————————-

The traditional metrics don’t always fit the vision, so we should instead ask the right questions for our churches. If we have decided to reference standard “scorecards,” then we might miss what God is wanting to do right now.

lift-to-install-industrial-fan
Members of Forefront installing an industrial fan at the Boys & Girls Club

You’re not that good

By Lee Kemp 

A lot of times I think I’m a go-getter. I take on a bunch of stuff and think I can get everything done, but then I realize I’ve committed to too many things have to tell myself, “You’re not that good, Lee.”

If we were having coffee and you asked how my week’s been, I would have to be honest and say that it’s been a hard week. I’ve worked non-stop for 12 days straight, and now all I can think about is when can I take off? When can I take my wife on a date? If you’re like me this week, and you need a laugh, let me tell you why I’m in this place…

strengths finder 2.0One of the first books I read before becoming a church planter was “Strengths Finder 2.0,” which helped me discover and rank my personal strengths. My wife and I did the assessment together, and what we found is that we are completely different! My number one strength is called “Woo,” while Sarah’s is “Deliberative”:

Woo (Me)

“Woo stands for winning others over. You enjoy the challenge of meeting new people and getting them to like you. Strangers are rarely intimidating to you. On the contrary, strangers can be energizing. You are drawn to them. You want to learn their names, ask them questions, and find some area of common interest so that you can strike up a conversation and build rapport…Once that connection is made, you are quite happy to wrap it up and move on…In your world there are no strangers, only friends you haven’t met yet—lots of them.”

Deliberative (Sarah)

“You are careful. You are vigilant. You are a private person. You know that the world is an unpredictable place. Everything may seem in order, but beneath the surface you sense the many risks. Rather than denying these risks, you draw each one out into the open. Then each risk can be identified, assessed, and ultimately reduced. Thus, you are a fairly serious person who approaches life with a certain reserve. You select your friends cautiously and keep your own counsel when the conversation turns to personal matters…”

Honestly, I didn’t think that Sarah being deliberative was a strength; I saw it as indecisiveness. But this is who she is. And, as I dive into this blog post, you will see how she is exactly what I need. Somebody has to put a leash on me—Sarah is the leash!

Overextending

Even though to “woo” is my strength personally and in ministry, I’ve realized it also means I have a tendency to give up stuff. I give people the feeling that they can call me whenever, and I do this intentionally, but it doesn’t take me long to give up everything I need to do for the sake of helping others.

My week so far, just at a glance, looks like this:

Sunday…left the house at sunrise, church, drove to Joplin, Missouri and back

Monday…lunch meeting, helped mow two yards and another local church’s property

Tuesday…meeting w/ local business friend, office work in afternoon, meeting at night

Wednesday…coffee meeting with a family struggling financially, working on this blog, a facilities meeting, a personnel meeting, and led a Bible study at local boxing club

Thursday (today)…a lunch meeting, community networking, need to go to the store, having someone over for dinner

Friday…going to Russellville early a.m. and straight back, afternoon admin work, then dinner with Forefront’s elders and our new worship leader

Saturday…my son’s Grizzly football team tryouts, yard clean up in the community, and an outdoor movie night event at Timberline Apartments to continue outreach

SundayBreakfast club Sunday event in the a.m., luncheon at another church, Acts 1:8 meeting in afternoon, Associational meeting in the evening

As I’ve talked about in a previous post (“The struggle is real to be authentic”), I really push-back on making Sunday the Super bowl of Forefront’s ministry. But from looking at my calendar this week, there is obviously a danger in doing the opposite, right? I and plenty of other pastors are giving tons of our time away, and we need to be careful and protective of giving our attention to the Word, our families, and ourselves.

In ministry, I think our eyes can be bigger than our stomachs sometimes. What I mean is that we are passionate, some of us are type-A personalities, and we rally to a cause, but we can’t do it all. Why? Because we have over-extended our bandwidth.

I’m learning in church planning, by my own mistakes, that I not only need to plan for what I’ve committed to but also for randomness in my week, what I like to call holy interruptions. These interruptions aren’t a bad thing, but if I’m maxed out on my commitments then I may miss out. I have also noticed that it is through these holy interruptions that our mission is advanced into new waters.

Whoever you are, especially if you’re interested in church planting, learn from me and guard your bandwidth. I obviously don’t have this—not over-committing—figured out. If I did, I wouldn’t be in this place.

I guess it’s like learning to live within your means financially. You have to lead your life within your means. I have the challenge of being “fully present” in my doing, and so I find myself leading on auto pilot.  Although that may work in church life and with others who don’t know you, it doesn’t work with your wife and kids.  Take it from me on this!

How you can pray for me

  • There’s a lot going on at Forefront that I hope to share with you in the next few weeks, which is one of the main reasons I’ve overextended myself. God is doing good things, and I am excited to tell you about it! Please pray for these developments.
  • Pray that I will make time to be in the Word, with my family, and to take care of myself.   

 

From homeless to homemaker

By Lee Kemp 

A few years ago, the manager of a Motel 6 in Fort Smith called me to refer a lady who could use some help.  We had developed a friendship with Motel 6 through ministering to so many folks, and we had even been able to develop a corporate discount rate to help people.  

I met DeLayne at McDonald’s right next to the hotel. She sat there with me and another elder of Forefront. We filled out this sheet to assess what she needed and figure out if we could meet that need. I could tell she was nervous and had been through a lot. I stopped her and reassured her that she could relax and didn’t have to sell us on helping her. 

DeLayne had fibromyalgia and had been living with her mom for a season to take care of her. After her mom needed to change living conditions, DeLayne moved with her daughter Sarah to Fort Smith. It wasn’t long in their new beginning that Sarah lost her job. Because DeLayne had been completely dependent on Sarah, she became homeless. She had no place to go.

Forefront was pretty limited in what we could do for her right away, but we assured DeLayne that we wanted to be her faith family, and as her faith family we also wanted to do all we could do to help her get back to where she desired to be.     

{ As DeLayne’s faith family we wanted to do all we could do to help her get back to where she desired to be.}

DeLayne went to the Rescue Mission and was able to get a job, but Forefront could do things for her the Rescue Mission couldn’t do. As time went on we would help financially with small needs, and we loaned her a car that we used for local missions. She connected with our church and started coming to worship with us. 

And DeLayne got back up on her feet! She secured a good job, a home, and eventually met a really good guy, Will, who she recently married. Now she is a homemaker, and Will takes good care of her. DeLayne says she is a “kept woman.” 

DeLayne

She is now considering how she can serve others with her free time. One of the things she wants to do is help Forefront Church by volunteering in our office as my assistant. It’s amazing how she was ministered to by our church and is now giving back by serving the church.   

DeLayne is such a huge encouragement to anyone who knows her! She uses these three verses when encouraging folks about what God has done in her life: Jeremiah 33:3, Romans 8:28 & Philippians 4:19.

Forefront wants to be a church the community sees as an organization that meets needs. I have witnessed that we can never go wrong just getting out into the community and developing friendships that the Lord brings our way. It is through friendships with organizations and local businesses like Motel 6 that Forefront has had the opportunity to meet someone like DeLayne.

 {Forefront’s desire is to be at the forefront of what God is doing in changing the lives of those who feel far from God.  Our vision is to Reach the Lost, Equip the saved to reach others, and Serve God by using our gifts to show Jesus to the local community.  Our heart is to maintain an external focus as a church.}

Fighting the urge to reinvent the wheel in ministry

By Lee Kemp 

Sometimes churches start a ministry that already exists in the community. Other times, a ministry stops working but continues to be the focus of many churches. Why? 

Are we competing with other churches? Are we just doing for the sake of doing?

People have asked me about Forefront’s ministry, like when our church will start a choir ministry or community groups. Sometimes I tell them, “We’re probably never going to have that…” or “We’re a church plant; we’re not there yet.”

For example, Forefront tried launching community groups early on because we wanted to be like other churches. We tried community groups without the right training, and then found ourselves having to step back and re-evaluate what we were doing.

We had a lot of new believers at the time, so instead of community groups we switched to discipleship groups. Eventually I think that it will grow into community groups, but we needed to develop leaders first. 

{ In church planting it is important to take time to honestly evaluate what needs to be changed or cancelled.}  

Forefront also does not plan to have a traditional student ministry. When I was involved in student ministry prior to Forefront, I found there are churches who have made that ministry an island unto itself. It’s not that Forefront doesn’t minister to youth, but we think they should be involved in our church alongside adults. Our worship should be relevant enough to pique their interest, and if I can’t bring that next generation into our church service there’s a big problem.

So people might ask, “What is there on Wednesday night for my student?” I’m ok with our students going to other Baptist churches instead of reinventing the wheel. I don’t need to have a better youth group than them. My job is to plug my students into ministry, disciple them and lead them to be on mission with Jesus. There should be ways for them to serve that they want to be involved in.

So questions Forefront asks are:

  • What is it that God has called us to focus on?
  • Why is there a need for our church to be planted?
  • How will we stay true and authentic in vision instead of duplicating other local churches?

We need to be secure in our missional commitment to Christ and not focused on operating and programming around just maintaining a stagnant core group of Christians.   

Sometimes I feel that we as pastors need to be reminded that our goal is to be a group of cooperating churches—not competing churches. 

What would happen if we desired the churches in our community to succeed even if it meant before our own church success? What would it look like if we just simply acknowledged each other’s strengths and united to support each other in those strengths? 

I don’t know if Arkansas is ready for the impact that would be unleashed if we began to foster a cooperative spirit instead of a competitive spirit! 

I will now step off of my soap box. 🙂