If my church shut down, would the community wonder where we went?

By Andrew Munneke

Three people—me, my wife, and a friend from seminary—moved from Dallas to Fayetteville in 2013 with the purpose of planting a church. I didn’t know Fayetteville very well. I had never lived there, nor did I know a lot of people in the city, but we sold possessions and packed up what we had and moved to Arkansas.

Why? Because there were lost people there and the Gospel compelled us to go.

Most people don’t know this, but 18 percent of Fayetteville’s population are church-goers, which means 82 percent are unchurched. This also means 1) there is an obvious disconnect between believers engaging with the unchurched, and 2) there are large pockets of people here who don’t have a relationship with a Christian. That was something I couldn’t ignore.

Fayetteville is also a very global area with Walmart Corp. and the University of Arkansas. People and students come from all over the world, stay here for a short season, and then go back home. the-hill-church-logo

Let the missional opportunity of that sink in. We can impact the nations in our own backyard!

Another major reason we were drawn to Fayetteville is the projected growth of the area. By 2040, Northwest Arkansas is supposed to grow by 58.3 percent, meaning the population of Northwest Arkansas and Little Rock will be the same. Who will win? I don’t know, but that’s the projection. It’s an interesting reality.

Here’s the thing. You can always run stats until the cows come home because, yeah, we can find out percentages about the unchurched. But what’s more important is what is keeping the other 82 percent of people from setting their foot in the church.

{ What are people’s emotional, spiritual, etc. reasons for not setting foot in the church? Those questions can only be answered through conversations. }

What is their reason? Sure, why are the churches there not reaching them, but what are these people’s emotional, spiritual, etc. reasons? Those questions can only be answered through conversations. That was big for us.

So our initial model for a church was building around this question: What would our church look like if we understood that we are sent missionaries to the lost people of our city?

The Vision of Presence

We knew going in that making an impact in Fayetteville was something only God could do. It wouldn’t be my fancy vision, not my zeal for this or that, not my gifts or talents, but only the Spirit of God working.

Step one in reaching Fayetteville was prayer. My wife and I, our friend, and another couple all gathered in my living room to pray just the five of us. This prayer gathering was us literally saying that we believed this church was going to make Kingdom impact, and to do it we needed His Spirit. (And that wasn’t just a one-time prayer; we continue to have these prayer meetings on the first Wednesday of every month.)

The next step was casting a compelling vision for why Fayetteville needed our church. Not that established churches weren’t doing their jobs, but we considered the bandwidths where we could meet needs that other churches’ bandwidths didn’t.

One way we did this was by asking, “What is the brokenness in the city? What are some of the areas that need the Gospel and need Gospel work done?”

{ Step one in reaching Fayetteville was prayer… us literally saying that we believed this church was going to make Kingdom impact, and to do it we needed His Spirit. }

We saw certain areas of Fayetteville that were poor and impoverished and didn’t have a church presence. Churches were going in, serving these people, and coming out, but they were not an incarnational presence. These churches were doing a good job making a needs-transaction, but we wanted to meet a self-worth need. We thought having an incarnational presence could really be a big factor in reaching these people.

From the beginning, our church has had the desire to be incarnational. In our early gatherings, we met in our house. Later, in our first location, we met in a shopping center, but we felt this angst. We were in a very visible spot, but here’s the reality: it was hard to build intentional relationships with people who needed us. This need outweighed our desire to be seen, so we sacrificed visibility to live incarnationally and moved to an old church building in a neighborhood.

So all of that to say, we started what we call Gospel-Communities. We did this first because the Gospel community gathers people and then sends people out. We started in June 2013, and by January 2014 our first Gospel-Community multiplied into three Gospel-Communities and we were ready to launch our services. 

Our shopping center location at the time of the launch. 

A City on a Hill

This month we are celebrating three years at The Hill Church! We have changed things that we wrote on the whiteboard three years ago, and we might change things in the future. But we know our city, our neighborhood, and who we are called to serve better.

Church planting isn’t what I thought it was—pastors who know more about what they are against than what they are for, or youth pastors who couldn’t be promoted any higher in their church. There is a necessity for it, and the book of Acts explains that clearly.


Church plants are 60 to 80 percent more likely to reach the unchurched. In other words, church planting is the best way to reach unreached people. Knowing that church planting is the best tool we have to reach the unchurched is a pretty strong conviction for me.

The number one purpose of a church plant should be to reach the lost.

Something we have said since the beginning is this: If our church shut down, who would knock on our doors wondering where we went? That is the city on the hill that vanishes, like a light that goes out in a dark place. This truth has led us to not only build relationships with people across the street but also at the community center next door to us.

I don’t think we shine as bright as a huge light, but the neighborhood feels our presence. I hope that we are being enough of a light for the people around us so that if we were to shut down, the lack of a Gospel presence would be felt.


Heart transformations in Fort Smith

By Lee Kemp

This past weekend 1,800 people came to partner with many local churches in Fort Smith for the Acts 1:8 One Day Mission Trip.  We saw 67 people pray to receive Christ on Saturday! I wanted to take a moment and just share four quick highlights of what I saw God do in the hearts of those from Fort Smith who served that day. 

1. Realized the need to minister outside the walls of a church

One of things I heard at a luncheon with Fort Smith pastors after the event was that “we have people ready and wanting to continue serving our city like we did this past weekend.”  Most pastors have a desire to serve outside of the church, but when people tell their pastors that they want to do more for their city, that is on another level!

2. Reminded to serve alongside each other as the body of Christ

The church culture in Fort Smith is sadly one of a “competitive nature.”  It is rare that churches come together to serve as co-laborers in the Gospel.  Last weekend, we saw many churches work alongside each other and have a great time doing it, too.  Hopefully God will continue to work in our hearts to focus on impacting lost-ness in our city!

3. Challenged to share the Gospel for the first time in their locale

I heard one pastor share about how a lady in his church was so excited because she shared the Gospel for the first time.  It is always exciting when we see someone overcome their fear of sharing how Christ has impacted their life!   

4. Accepted Christ as Savior

We had two ladies visit Forefront Church this past week because they came to the block party at Stephen’s Boys and Girls Club.  The coolest part was that one of them prayed to receive Christ Sunday morning!  I am praying more and more stories will trickle-in the next few weeks about how people are going to church for the first time and finding hope in Christ. (I know we have several families coming to visit Forefront this coming Sunday!)

_____    ______    _____

Please be in prayer for the churches in the Fort Smith area as they continue to follow-up and connect with the 1,200 families who have expressed interest in a local church.  Even more, be in prayer for the 67 people (and growing) who are coming to know Christ, and that they will get connected with and be disciple by a local church. 

Thoughts on faith and our daily bread

By Lee Kemp 

This summer Forefront hosted “Summer Fun Days” at Timberline Apartments to make a positive impact on kids who would otherwise spend the summer alone.

Monday through Wednesday we would meet from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. In the morning we played games, sang songs, made crafts, and told Bible stories. After we fed the kids lunch, they would swim in the pool for afternoon playtime. Then on Thursdays we would go on fieldtrips to places like the nature center and skating rink. We even had a special water slide party one day with the fire department’s help.

This summer alone, we reached 58 kids. Seven of those kids prayed to receive Christ!

This was our third and best year for Summer Fun Days. It came together really well, but we’re learning how to do it better. This summer Forefront had two E4Call interns, college students who feel called to ministry, named Joel and Taylor. They connected and served with Forefront for the summer.

Joel and Taylor were not only a blessing to us as a church but also the many kids/families we met through the summer program. Here’s the thing: We wouldn’t have had the ability to pay them if it wasn’t for Dixie Jackson dollars. Other churches’ giving gave us the money to pay them.

The conundrum of money in ministry  

Early in Forefront’s ministry, a local businessman—Steve—told me something about money that really convicted me. He said, “Lee, I’ve never seen a ministry that Jesus wanted to see done that didn’t happen because of money.”

I know when we start talking about money everybody gets weird, but the raw and the real is that we’ve got to be careful with how we view money in ministry.

To me, there are two sides of the continuum. There’s the guy who may not plant a church because he doesn’t have the money. He is sitting there, stressed, and thinking that if he doesn’t raise some sort of money then he can’t start, or he thinks he knows how much money it’s going to take. But by then, he isn’t really thinking about church planting.

There’s a guy I talked with once who said, “You know, I really wanted to be a church planter, but I don’t know about the financial instability. And I’m not good at raising money.”

{ I’ve never seen a ministry that Jesus wanted to see done that didn’t happen because of money.}

On the other end, there’s an established church that has more than enough money but is trying to figure out what to do with their end of the year excess. When they planned their budget, the church was saying, “This is what we need in order to do what God’s placed on our hearts.” That’s really what a budget is. And they’ve not only met that budget but they’ve exceeded it.

I’ve been in that meeting before at an established church. God gave us an excess, and as support staff we put in our wish list of what we would like to get as if it was Christmas. Instead of having just one projector that everyone looks at on the left side of the room, we could get one for the right side. Or we could look into getting a church van with a better air conditioner.

But I don’t ever remember thinking, “Hey, we could give that to missions.” I was thinking of my own kingdom and not God’s. I’m not saying it’s wrong to “up” your game or buy a better projector for your auditorium, but how can we spur generosity?

I remember asking once about stewardship during an ordination council meeting. Lee Woodmansee said, “Every time we come along an extra sum of money, we ask the Lord, ‘Ok, who do you want us to give it to?’”

A lot of times we don’t think this way.

Ping pong back to the guy who is worried about money and is expecting money from another church. He’s thinking about what it takes to get the church up and running instead of God’s kingdom. He’s paralyzed. What would it look like if that church planter realized he will never have enough money—at any given point—to supply all the church will ever need, but he does have enough to start?

Walking (and spending) with faith

A pastor pulled out a white handkerchief once to clean his glasses, and he said to me, “When you surrendered to ministry you raised this white flag.” If God wants to send me, then where he sends me he will provide for me. It’s so simple, but it’s so hard to walk out.

You can never have enough money in ministry. It’s expensive. It’s risky. And even if you have money, ministry will probably take more money than you currently have.

In the Bible, there’s manna—when God is providing. Then there’s man taking more than God instructed—where men tried to provide for themselves by their own efforts.

The point here is being careful not to spoil ourselves with something God really didn’t give us. When we have this abundance, instead of asking What do we want? we should be asking How much should we really keep?

What if we looked at money as if it was manna?

Baptist churches think about a lot of good things in their budget: how to provide for their staff, what’s going to support the key ministries their staff oversee, how to retire debt, how to fit capital items in their budget, building a budget to get people excited, etc. I’ve been a part of teams where we did that and God still gave us excess, and I made the mistake thinking it was for us just because we had already put those “visionary” things in our budget.

{ I made the mistake thinking the excess was for us just because we had already put those “visionary” things in our budget.}

And there’s this strategy of us cooperating as Baptist churches. God has blessed us! Not only with what we need to do ministry but more because we do it together! Forefront’s goal as a church plant was not to plant or pastor a church that thinks about its own people. We are building God’s kingdom in the state of Arkansas. Other peoples’ success is our success, but only if we’re cooperating.

If your church gives a large amount to Dixie Jackson or to the Cooperative Program, someone will be blessed! Sometimes we don’t want to because we won’t physically see where it goes, or what it does. But what is that expressing? Where’s the Holy Spirit in this? I think at times the reason we are lax in giving is because of a spirit of control.

It’s just that I think our questions about money really ought to be, What are we doing here? and What is the Holy Spirit leading us to do with it?  How are we advancing God’s Kingdom within our local church and the capital “C” Church?

We can wisely spend the money that God has entrusted us with and still think big!   

God is already there

By Nicole Hutcheson 

I spent this summer on the other side of the world in Southeast Asia. Though I can’t say which country I served in, I can say it is against the law to “Christianize” the people who live there. The good news is that God is already there, even in the hardest and most closed places.

It’s illegal to share the Gospel. It’s hard. But we have to go!

My team and I had to use a lot of discernment as we talked to people, but our priority was not the number one concern—the people we met were. Someone told us during training that we were on a rescue mission, so we kept that mindset the entire summer. 

We would really want to share with someone, but the opportunity did not come up naturally in the conversation. Silently, we would ask the Lord to please open a door. So many times I was praying that specific prayer, and the door would open right in that instant.

Relying on God

We had a neighbor in one of the cities where our team was staying. For several weeks we visited with her, but the opportunity to share the Gospel never came up.

On our last night in the city, we were having dinner with this woman. I was sitting on the edge of my seat asking God for his help because we still had not shared the Gospel.

Then my teammate sneezed. The woman turned to her and said the traditional “May Jesus bless you,” but in her language. When I heard her say his name I asked, “Would you tell me what you just said?” She said it again, so I asked, “Do you mean Jesus Christ?” In that moment we shared the entire Gospel with her.

{ Later, our team talked about how God just used a sneeze to share the Gospel! }

Also about the midpoint of our trip our team was struggling because we hadn’t seen a lot of fruit from our work. We knew that the Lord was faithful—that we might just be planting seeds—but we were praying and hoping we would see someone come to know him.

We had the day off from work, so we were spending the day at the beach just paddle boarding, relaxing, and having a good time with our team coordinator and his family. One of my teammates went down the beach to buy coconuts for us, and he realized the guy he was buying from had a Bible verse on his shirt.

He asked the man if he knew what the shirt said and meant, and when he answered “no,’’ my teammate shared the Gospel with him. The man accepted the Lord on the beach right there! The guys went back later and talked with him, studied the Word, gave him a Bible, and really solidified that faith.

It was just the coolest thing to see that, but this moment spoke to more than that. We were trying so hard to be faithful and wanting things to go the way we thought they should, and when we least expected it God moved into that man’s heart and changed his life.

God is definitely moving in this nation! (For a similar God story, be sure to checkout Lee’s post “God is still on the move” about a divine encounter with a member of the Arapaho Tribe.) 

Sharing the Gospel is more than telling

Last September, I was reading in the New Testament and God told me I should checkout church plants in our area. I thought, “That would be cool. Ok.” A few days later, my Baptist Collegiate Ministry (BCM) campus minister, Lee Woodmansee, told me that a local church planter would be speaking at one of our events.

It was Lee Kemp. After he spoke, I introduced myself and told him, “I’m coming to your church on Sunday.” I’ve been going to Forefront Church ever since.

After I got back from Southeast Asia, I was sitting at Forefront and very distinctly God told me, “This is what you’re going to do. Go out and make disciples.” In order to go and make disciples, we have to have to create a place to come together.

Nicole (left) with members of her team.

We can’t ignore that fact as believers. We can’t just go and tell people about Jesus. We have to see it through! We need people to grow with new believers, to come beside them, and walk with them through life. You get that that discipleship and community through church.

To me, it’s not about becoming a “church planter.” It’s just part of my call.

Attending Forefront, I’ve kind of seen how church planting works. I’m pretty sure that will be my future in international missions: planting a church with local believers and knowing the church and their outreach will continue even after I leave.

I don’t know how I will get to that point, but I think it’s a biblical truth. That’s what we should do. One of the things they say in East Asia’s underground church is this: “Every member of a church is a church planter, and every church planter plants churches.” 

College, missions, or both? 

I’m not on the field right now, and that’s hard! I’m now a senior at the University of Arkansas – Fort Smith. I know I’m supposed to finish school, but I also need to play an active role in missions work.

We had one lesson this summer that was about different aspects of missions, like praying for and mobilizing missionaries. What that looks like for me as a college student is telling people about my experience, encouraging them to do international missions, and explore those options with them.

At the same time, I just completed the first step in a long application to become an IMB Journeyman. I had kind of written it off as too big of a commitment (two years), but after a summer of serving with Nehemiah Teams I am convinced this is what God is telling me to do. So I’m praying he will see me through again!

Want to learn more about Nehemiah Teams? Be sure to checkout the “Team Work” CP Share story!   

Nicole’s video diary 

Reflections from a week WITH the Arapaho Tribe

By Lee Kemp 

Since I returned home from Wyoming, I have found myself refreshed and renewed in my commitment to see God move through me and Forefront Church. (Checkout last week’s post to see how God moved during our trip!)  I think that is how almost everyone feels after a productive time on a mission trip in another ministry context.

Today, I thought I would just drop a few reflections and thoughts here for us to remember and consider as we seek to advance God’s Kingdom and the Gospel.

When we minister, prepositions matter

Something I was trained in but still forget time to time is that prepositions matter in ministry. 

When we do something TO to a people, we create oppressionAlthough this is a silent and an unspoken oppression, people can still feel like we are coming off better than them.

When we do something FOR a people, we create co-dependency. In this approach, even if we do reach the intended people, we reach them in a way where they will need us to continue to focus on the Lord.  Our model can lack the ability to be reproduced within a people group. 

When we do something WITH a people, we create life-transformation. This approach is always slower and takes way more time.  It takes a considerable amount of energy and is usually avoided because it drives on the fuel of relationships. 

It has been said that the reason we don’t tell our people about Jesus is because we don’t tell Jesus about our people. I now add that the reason we don’t reach our unreached people groups is because we avoid the WITH approach in our methods of ministry. 

May we remember that our message never changes, but our METHODS of delivering our message needs to be continually evaluated.

May we all take to time to consider the prepositions within our ministries! 

God is still on the move

By Lee Kemp 

This week Forefront Church is in Riverton, Wyoming! We are ministering to the Northern Arapaho, one of the last critically unreached Native American tribes.

Grand Avenue Baptist Church in Fort Smith has come here for the last five years, but this year we (Forefront) and Palestine Baptist Church in Greenwood, Ark., have joined them. There are about 45 of us altogether.

Our goal for the trip is not to do a bunch of things but to continue to build relationships with the Arapaho. In the morning we are picking up trash, mowing yards and getting to know the neighbors of the community. In the afternoons we are learning about the history of the Arapaho before going back to the reservation for the evening. We have bought sports equipment and a basketball goal for the kids, and we are beading bracelets with them.

We are sharing the message of Jesus, but we are making sure not to push too hard. We are focusing on relationships.

Please pray for us! God is working, and He was working long before we got here…

A divine encounter

I had driven back to our hotel to look for money I thought was lost. After I looked over the hotel room and climbed back into the bus, I found the money in the dash. I stopped freaking out and turned the bus around to pick up our group at the reservation.

That’s when I see a guy in a wheelchair with a young man kneeling beside him. Both were Native American.

The Holy Spirit nudged me right there and told me to go back and talk to them. I said to God, “I don’t know what they’re doing,” but He said, “It doesn’t matter.”

So I parked the bus, walked up and found that they were praying. I didn’t know if they were praying in Jesus’ name or what, so I just stood there listening and praying, too.

Before the young man finished the prayer, I heard him say, “Where there are two or more gathered in Your name, You are there.”

After I introduced myself and told them that God told me to turn around, the young man—whose name is Joel—said, “No way! I’m a pastor.” Joel is 19-years-old and feels called to ministry. He had stopped to pray for Reggie to be healed.

{ Before the young man finished the prayer, I heard him say, “Where there are two or more gathered in Your name, You are there.”}

We tried to get Reggie up and walking, but he got tired so we sat him back down.

That is when I asked Reggie who he believed Jesus is. He said, “One we can trust in.” When I asked if he had ever trusted Jesus to save his soul, he said, “I wouldn’t go that far.”

I shared with him Romans 5:8 and other scriptures, and how Jesus will create a new heaven and new earth one day because all other things will pass away. I explained that his soul is eternal, how it will never pass away, and he needed Jesus to save his soul. I told him that I loved him, and I didn’t just want to pray for him to be healed but for his soul to be saved.

Reggie and Lee

So I asked Reggie if he felt like that is something he wanted to do and he said yes!  Then he allowed me to pray with him, and he accepted Christ as we prayed together right there on the sidewalk!

God had not sent me back to the hotel to find the money I thought was lost. He was orchestrating this whole encounter.

I told Reggie, “Your people don’t know the good news of Jesus, and they don’t know what I’ve told you today. He wants to use you to reach your people.”

Not only that, but Joel lives in the same Arapaho reservation that our missions team is working in! He is not even Arapaho, but his sisters are!

There is a backstory to this. Scott Ward (with Grand Avenue Baptist) has been praying for the past five years to meet someone who already has influence here for us to partner with. Joel has now been introduced to Scott, and we plan to stay connected with him and foster this relationship.

God is so on the move! It is evident.

{ God had not sent me back to the hotel to find the money I thought was lost. He was orchestrating this whole encounter.}

The struggle is real to be authentic

By Lee Kemp 

My family just had pictures made, and it made me think of authenticity. You might look at our family photo and think “Aw what a cute family!” but when we took these photos, I was threatening my kids to behave so that they would look nice!

We—church planters—care about image just like everybody else. And sometimes, we want to change our vision just so we think you will accept us.

Acceptance might be from people in the community or from my pastor friends. When I go to my association, I want them to like me. That’s what I’m thinking! I’m the odd guy out. I don’t have deacons, and everybody looks to me to do something. So I’ve found myself trying to fit-in with my friends and other pastors.

What I am trying to convey is that most church planters can have a sense of feeling lonely.    

It’s hard to remember who you are and why you began. I want to have something that looks good on the outside, but it’s kinda gooey and nasty if I’m not who God told me to be on the inside. I might please man, but I don’t please God.

{ I want to have something that looks good on the outside, but it’s kinda gooey and nasty if I’m not who God told me to be on the inside.}

This is hard in a lot of areas, not just church planting, like who you are starting to be in Christ. Even when you look up to people, you see how they might change to be accepted. I think in such a social media-driven age, we are trying to be accepted and not unique.

Vision leaks

Every church was a church plant at one point. Every time a church is planted, there is a felt burden from the Lord on his people to actually plant that church.

And a lot of times that church is birthed out of taking on a specific people group, or filling a void in the capital “C” church within that community. Every church usually starts with that purpose in mind—hopefully to glorify God—but also with specific ministry ideas.

Andy Stanley once said, “Vision leaks.” Like a water leak. That means when I start with a specific idea in mind, the idea of why I started eventually loses its traction. So I have to go back and remember what I did in the beginning.

In my mind, I like to say “Repent and do the things you did at first,” realizing we have ventured away from what we started out to do. But one thing that I know for sure, what I’ve witnessed in my experience, is that it’s not a healthy reason to start a new church just to gather more saved people.

Taking cookies to the neighborhood


So, one of the things that we at Forefront have learned—and are still learning—is how to protect the vision, the authentic vision of being a missional church in Fort Smith, Arkansas. And that’s very hard because in our context, we are seen as a church that does things a little outside the box, and that’s probably true.

We started out being very missional. Along the way, though, we have caught ourselves trying to be like other churches in the area. We wanted the big church service and experience…at the sacrifice of the mission.

When Forefront said we were going to be authentic, we said we wanted to be on-mission. We prepare for our weekly missions, and Sunday is just kind of a reboot so that we go back out during the week and exhaust ourselves.

The Sunday service isn’t the best way to reach the lost—we don’t think it is. It’s going to happen in our day-to-day relationships outside the doors of the church. We feel led to go out and do outreach in the city, and the people that come to those outreach events come to church.

{ The Sunday service isn’t the best way to reach the lost–we don’t think it is.}

So when we measure how we’re doing as a church, we don’t just look at Sunday morning. We look at other ministries with the Boys & Girls club and the apartment ministries. We are trying to position people to go out in the community and serve rather than start a church service that’s well attended.

We felt the need to walk away from that. Sometimes we’ve made church a big, big deal, and we need to be living for God where we live, work and play.

Sunday is the locker room, not the Super Bowl

We always say that Sunday is the locker room, and the weekday is the Super Bowl. When I was on a church staff back in the day, it was the opposite.

I used to hear I should study one hour for every minute I preach. But that leaves your people out to dry because they need you to lead or walk alongside them during the week. Instead of spending 20 hours on my sermon, I spend six because I have to put Sunday in a realistic perspective.

{ Our goal at Forefront is to gather for worship as a church, assembling…but then unleashing our church to engage the community.}

Some missional community-minded guys can be a little weird about Sundays, going to the extreme of not having a worship service. I wanted to plant a church with Sunday acting as what pulls our resources together. Our goal at Forefront is to gather for worship as a church, assembling—like what I read in the New Testament—but then unleashing our church to engage the community.

Forefront provided lunch for the Grizzlies after a win

Imagine all the good groups in Fort Smith whose goal is to accomplish good things. If you look at their biggest needs, they need volunteers. Then imagine a church of 300 or 500 people that sends its members right back out into the community to join those causes! Here come 8-10 Christians going to this or that…

If we become a gym instead of a holding-pen for Christians, if this is a spiritual place to be encouraged to go back into the community, now you have something authentic. You’re seeking the good of your city.

In Jeremiah 29, God tells them to seek the welfare of their city. We at Forefront Church are trying to seek the welfare of Fort Smith. This is not ultimately our home, but we’ve been told to bring heaven to earth, and we didn’t think we could do that by sticking to planning Sundays only.

{ Forefront Church exists to REACH the lost, EQUIP the saved to reach others, and SERVE God by using our gifts to show Jesus to the local community. } 

Thoughts for planters/potential planners:   Discover. Discern. Do. Debrief.

Discover where is God at work in my community?

Discern In light of the resources that my church might potentially have or does have, what can I do to partner with God?

Do We stick to the vision we said we’re going to do, and we do it. We don’t want to plan to do something and then not do it.

Debrief How did it go? Is there anything else the Lord is telling us to do? Have we stuck true to the vision we set-out to do?